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We have a brand new #wingwoman this week, featuring Michelle Afia Owusu! Michelle recently launched a new business called Majesty which sells elegant silk accessories for your skin and hair. In our interview, Michelle opens up about how time is the key thing to making all of her important relationships work, how she views finding her purpose similar to dating, and how her mom's resourcefulness when she was younger still inspires her today. Continue reading to learn all about the amazing, Michelle!



1. What makes you happy?


A good laugh, I love to laugh, hear people laugh and find reasons to smile. If I'm hanging out with someone, watching a show, reading a book, thinking a thought, hearing about someone's day and it makes me or them chuckle, laugh, or smile - that's happiness to me.


2. What advice would you give your younger self?


Learn to love rejection, it's a part of following your dreams. 


3. If you could magically solve one problem in the world, what would that be?


That every person on the planet has access to clean, fresh, running water and nutritious food. 


4. How did you find your purpose?


I'm still looking for my purpose. A wise person once told me that, finding your purpose is a lot like finding a partner. You have to date around, and try different things until you find the right one. I'm currently in the dating process and figuring out what I enjoy most, and where I can provide the most value. 


5. What is your biggest pain point in building relationships?


My biggest pain point in building relationships is managing time. I think it's really important to cherish all of the relationships you have in your life, which means checking in, following up, hanging out celebrating them, encouraging them and that all takes considerable time. It's important to me to reserve time for those that matter most in my life. 


6. What have you learned from past friendships that didn't work out?


That confrontation can be the scariest thing, but it's a beautiful thing. If something doesn't feel right, let them know; if they are truly your friend, they'll understand, and if you're truly their friend, you'll forgive, and vice versa. 


7. Who are your SHEroes (AKA female heroes)?


My Mother, Agnes Adomako. We didn't grow up with a lot, but she was resourceful and always figured out ways to make sure we had everything we needed. Oprah Winfrey, she was the first black woman I saw growing up on television that was making a difference in the lives of people everywhere. Harriet Tubman, her courage, dedication, and strength is something I admire to this day. Maya Angelou, her way of words has brought so much creativity, excitement, and healing to my life. Issa Rae and Michaela Coel, these woman share who they are, what they are made of, and their story on the TV screen. They do it with diligence, grace and vulnerability, and have really inspired myself and many others to share their story. 


8. What podcasts/books are you listening/reading right now?


Podcasts:

Jason Calacanis - Angel Podcast 


Books:

Let Love Have the Last Word - Common 

The Water Dancer - Ta-Nehisi Coates 

Start with Why - Simon Sinek


9. Where can we find you?


You can find me on instagram at @Michelle.afia or my business account @yourmajesty.shop.


We're back with another #wingwoman of the week, featuring Meghan Way! Some of you may remember Meghan from our Wild Woman Rising retreat last October when she led our luscious yoga session right before lunch (take me back!). In our interview, Meghan shares how she learned to embrace her "weird" and how she wishes other women would as well, how she strongly believes in the magic and power that women possess, and how when it comes to her purpose in life, she aims to make a positive difference in the world in whatever way that comes. Continue reading to learn all about Meghan!



1. What makes you happy?


It’s taken me a long time to understand this, but my relationships bring me the most joy in life. Covid really hammered that home. My husband, my family, my friends, the circles I’ve built through yoga and writing and finance. I also gain a lot of joy from making a difference in people’s lives and helping people grow.


2. What advice would you give your younger self?


Embrace your weird and never let yourself conform to society’s vision of what a woman should be. I was a weird kid - I wrote poetry and novels and letters to fictional characters. I talked to trees. I full heartedly believed in magic. I made potions and concoctions in the woods. I told friends I was sick and couldn’t go out, so I could stay home and watch cartoons or write. I hid these part of me for so long, and pretended to enjoy so many things because of what society expected of me. Coming into my own power and embracing the things that set me apart was like being gifted a giant breath after I'd been drowning. All of our weirdness, the things people don’t understand about us, that’s our magic. And it is incredible.


3. If you could magically solve one problem in the world, what would that be?


For women to understand, value, and embrace their true power. For women to stop asking permission to be everything that they were meant to be. For women to lift each other up, always, rather than tear each other down. If we could do that, the world would be altered in an incredible way, forever.


4. How did you find your purpose?


To be completely honest, I think I’m still figuring this out. I have this deep seated belief that helping and healing is my purpose, and I’m still trying to fully understand what that looks like. I have a very clear set of values, and I let those guide me, but I’m generally a bit of a leaf in the wind. I take opportunities as they come, and do my best to make a difference. I try to be the best human I can possibly be every single day, and believe to my core that everything else will work itself out.


5. What is your biggest pain point in building relationships?


I don’t trust easily, and so opening up to new people is difficult. I’m also very focused, a little bit intense, and decently socially awkward, and so I can come off as unfriendly or standoffish before people get to know me. I struggle with the courage to just go up and make conversation or invite people places. I’ve been working hard on this over the last couple of years <3


6. What have you learned from past friendships that didn't work out?


That I am responsible for my own actions and my own happiness. If I am being the best me that I can be, and others don’t want to show up for that, that’s ok. I am not for everyone. And everyone is not for me. Learning that this doesn’t make me less, or them less, has changed my life. I am certainly not perfect at it, but I am now much better at letting go of people and relationships that just aren’t working.


7. Who are your SHEroes (AKA female heroes)?


This sounds super cliche, but my mama is one of my biggest heroes. She raised her girls to be financially independent, confident, and kind. My sister is also my own personal SHEro- she’s a PICU nurse and one of the best people I know. I have so many real life SHEroes who lift me up and inspire me every single day - too many to list. On a global stage, I adore Bozma Saint John, who shows that you can be a big time executive while never losing your own style or voice.


8. What podcasts/books are you listening/reading right now?


Get Out of Your Own Way by Dave Hollis, How to be AntiRacist by Ibram X. Kendi. I read Atomic Habits by James Clear a couple of months ago, and HIGHLY recommend as well.



9. Where can we find you?


All over the place! IG @meghanvictoria__ , teaching yoga in person @yogaandbeyond and online @rikkimaeyoga , teaching creative writing @thealexandracentresociety , and when crest the Covid hump, at many of the women in business functions that take place around the city <3


Another week, another #wingwoman! This week, we are chatting with Christine Bassit, Owner and Creative Director of Postpartum Queen. In our interview, Christine shares why she is so passionate about helping other women's postpartum journey (I mean, have you seen what great stuff she puts in each box?!), how she initially struggled making friends after her first baby, and how her American aunts and cousins are inspiring her with their efforts in the BLM movement. Continue reading to learn more about the incredible Christine!



1. What makes you happy?


Getting together with friends and laughing the entire time, when my kids play (and actually get along), painting with my kids, writing, and date night with my husband.


2. What advice would you give your younger self?


I would definitely tell my younger self to take more risks, travel by yourself, and believe in yourself when it comes to your career. I often felt like everyone else was more qualified than me in certain jobs, but I realized that was just me self doubting myself for no reason.


3. If you could magically solve one problem in the world, what would that be?


Racism! I wish this world would just learn to all love each other and not judge people based on the colour of their skin. My own daughter is already starting to face racism at her school (she’s 6), and it’s the same experiences I faced 30 years ago at the same time. It makes me sad that both of my kids will most likely have to go through the same negative racist experiences that I did.


4. How did you find your purpose?


By realizing that I needed to do a job that helped people by using my own experiences when it came to Postpartum. I had good and negative aspects to both of my own Postpartum experiences, and I realized most women were having terrible ones and that I needed to do something to help other moms. So that’s why I started Postpartum Queen - our kits are filled with all of the essentials that moms need to heal faster after labour plus all the resources to help you with sleep, breastfeeding, pelvic floor issues, maternal mental health and more.


5. What is your biggest pain point in building relationships?


I definitely found it really hard to make and build new authentic friendships right after having my first baby. I think when you are have just had a baby, and especially if you’re the first one in your group of friends to have a baby like I was, you can definitely feel a bit isolated, especially during that Postpartum period.


6. What have you learned from past friendships that didn't work out?


That when someone shows you who they are, believe them the first time. I definitely give people too many chances, and I’ve learnt the hard way that if you see someone doing something or talking about other friends all the time, they are most likely going to do it to you. Also that friendship should be reciprocal. If you're the only one always helping someone and it’s always one sided, you’ll never have your cup filled by that person. Don’t let a friendship drain you.


7. Who are your SHEroes (AKA female heroes)?


I really admire Michelle Obama, and right now honestly, all of my Black American cousins and aunts that are marching in the Black Lives Matter protests in the USA. We are already starting to see a change that is happening when it comes to anti racism and the injustices BIPOC face every day, and it’s definitely females leading the way.


8. What podcasts/books are you listening/reading right now?


Right now, I’ve just started Michelle Obama’s book, "Becoming," and I just finished Gabrielle Union’s book, "We’re Going to Need More Wine."




9. Where can we find you?


You can follow me @postpartumqueen

Or reach out to me through my website- www.postpartumqueen.com.

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