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This week, we chat with the lovely Grace Dela Cruz, owner of Lōkahi Scrunchies. In our interview, she shares how her path has not been direct, ranging from becoming a Red Seal Chef at age 22 to working in aviation for 12+ years, to most recently, starting her own hair accessories company. Grace's story will definitely speak to those who have pursued the path less traveled and listened to their heart's calling. Continue reading below to learn more all about this #wingwoman, Grace!




1. What makes you happy?


Pre-covid, spending time with my friends and loved ones, traveling as often as possible and going to fitness classes. Currently during this pandemic, knowing that my family is safe even though I can’t see them. Sunshine and good food has always made me happy too!


2. What advice would you give your younger self?


Don’t be afraid to take risks and quit telling yourself “you can’t/won’t succeed” because you will achieve anything you work towards!


3. If you could magically solve one problem in the world, what would that be?


Starvation. No one should go a day without having access to clean water and a proper meal. 


4. How did you find your purpose?


I don’t think that I have. I think we are constantly evolving. I am always seeking more. I went from wanting to be a chef and getting my red seal at 22, to returning to school, now working in aviation for +12 years and then almost a year ago starting a company (Lōkahi Scrunchies) for handmade hair accessories and going to school for Social Media Marketing. I enjoy and am blessed for my career as a flight attendant, but it’s not the last thing I’ll be doing I’m sure!


5. What is your biggest pain point in building relationships?


It surprises a lot of people, but I’m actually an introverted extrovert. Once I’m comfortable, I’m extremely outgoing, but in the beginning stages, I can be quite shy, so it can sometimes be difficult for me to get outside of my shell and build a bond.


6. What have you learned from past friendships that didn't work out?


I think it has taught me to have more patience but also to know my value and not put so much energy towards anyone or anything that doesn’t bring positivity to the friendship. 


7. Who are your SHEroes (AKA female heroes)?


My current SHEro would be BC’s Provincial Health Officer, Dr. Bonnie Henry. 


8. What podcasts/books are you listening/reading right now?


I’ve read and am re-reading “Girl, Wash Your Face” by Rachel Hollis.





9. Where can we find you?


You can follow my travel & food adventures on instagram! My handle is @oneflyfoodie and of course, there’s my labour of love @lokahiscrunchies, or you can head straight to the website: shoplokahi.com



This week, we get real and raw with Ashlee Steinhauer, founder of local jam company, Worthy. In our interview, Ashlee shares how her purpose found her, her experience with addictions recovery, and how she is passionate about changing the rhetoric behind addictions and reducing the stigma. She is also very open about one of her biggest challenges when she hires a new employee. I loved how open and vulnerable she was during this interview, and I know that you're going to fall in love with this week's #wingwoman! Continue reading to find out more!




1. What makes you happy?


Dogs, sunshine, my kids, my husband, walks, connection to my community (these are in no particular order!)


2. What advice would you give your younger self?


Stop looking outwardly for validation.  You can only find that from within!


3. If you could magically solve one problem in the world, what would that be?


I would make sure that all children in every corner in the world are fed, safe and loved.


4. How did you find your purpose?


My purpose found me!  I always loved cooking, and while I was a personal chef, I was offered a jam contract for two restaurants in Calgary.  The very same week that I started cooking jam for the restaurants, I entered into addictions recovery. With some work and reflection and a couple solid years in recovery, Worthy was born!  Through Worthy, I aim to reduce stigma and speak publicly about addictions - that’s my purpose.


5. What is your biggest pain point in building relationships?


I'm not great at training employees. When I work with new employees, I tend to assume that they possess all the production and product knowledge needed to produce jam, which is a totally unfair and untrue assumption. I often find myself simply setting them loose in the production facility without giving proper instruction. This pain point comes from a deep trust and surrender in others abilities, but it can set those I work with up for failure. This is the number one pain point I am working on in my work relationships - for obvious reasons!!


6. What have you learned from past friendships that didn't work out?


Friendships that don’t work out is the universe's way of protecting me from someone/something that isn’t good for/doesn’t serve me.


7. Who are your SHEroes (AKA female heroes)?


SIA, my baba, Julie Van Rosendaal, Taryn Strong, and Dawn Nickel


8. What podcasts/books are you listening/reading right now?


I love Podcasts!  Currently listening to Seek Purpose, Where Shall We Begin, Front Burner, CollisionsYYC, This American Life, She Recovers, and HeavyWeight


9. Where can we find you?


Right now you can find me at home :) On the internet, you can find me at www.enjoyworthy.com and on Instagram at @enjoyworthy




Back in university, I remember my roommate and her boyfriend got into an argument about friendship. She told him that she considered quite a few people her "best friends," and his argument was that you can only have one best friend - that's what makes that person the best. As I listened to each person list out the reasons about why they were right, I wondered how many others were firm believers in one philosophy or the other. Is it possible to have more than one best friend? Or even more than one friend group?


These days, I embrace the idea of having multi-faceted friend groups. I do have an inner core group of friends who I feel totally comfortable around, expose my heart without fear of judgement, and revel in our soul connection. I also have friends who I know will always be up for an adventure. I have friends who prefer to have coffee dates. I have friends where we encourage each other in our personal development journeys. With how fluid our lives are these days, especially once you are out of school, you need different types of people in your life to fill up your cup. If I didn't allow my circle to expand, I would have zero friends here in Calgary.


But let's face it - expanding your circle of friends is hard work. There will always be people who say they want more friends, but they never meet you in the middle to create that friendship. Or, even worse, they approach you under the guise of friendship, and it turns out they had ulterior motives the entire time (usually after the third coffee date, the conversation goes something like this - let me share with you about this business opportunity...). I think those moments have been the most hurtful for me because my love language is quality time, and when I give someone my time, it means that I am willing and excited to invest in that person. When it becomes clear that friendship was never on the table, it feels like the ultimate betrayal. And if these false starts keep happening with new friendships, it can be really disappointing and leaves you wondering why you keep trying. Trust me, girl - I have been there more times than I care to admit!


How do you overcome this? How do you start to build these friend groups that your soul is craving? Well, here are a few tips that have helped me along the way:


1. Release expectations for an immediate friendship. This one can be very hard to do at first, especially when you're really vibing with your new potential BFF. But even if you meet, click right away, and share some laughs, it does not mean the other person is in the right state to receive you into their life. They might be guarded, they might not be there for the right reasons, or they might not be that into you. Whatever the reason is, try not to take it personally if it doesn't progress after the first or second meetup. Acknowledge that their role in your life was for a brief moment and release them in love. The right person is out there, and they can't wait to meet you and send you constant memes and GIFs.


2. It's okay to grieve the endings of friendships. When a friendship comes to an end, it can be hard to let them go, even when you know in your heart that it's the right thing. It can feel like you've been rejected, especially when you see them spending time with other people. I had to say goodbye to many friendships after I went through a breakup, and I ended up grieving the loss of those friendships more than the actual breakup. I lost someone who felt like a sister, but in the end, I knew that I could not continue a friendship with her if I truly wanted to break free from my ex. Grief is a natural process, and although it sucks, it's important to go through all five stages and work through those emotions. Once you have grieved, it is so much easier to move on and open up your heart to new potential friendships.


3. Fast and furious friendships don't always work out. Have you ever met someone and immediately, you think to yourself, "OMG - I just met my soul sister!" You find yourself texting each other all day, seeing each other multiple times a week, and everything is SO perfect. And then, as quickly as it came, the friendship fizzles out and you're left wondering what the heck just happened? In these cases, you can either blame yourself for becoming boring and ordinary (which I highly doubt), or you take it as an opportunity to learn. Why did it fizzle so fast? Was it because you actually had nothing in common? Does this person churn and burn friends all the time? Just because there was an initial spark does not mean the friendship will grow into a warm fire - sometimes, it stops at the spark and never catches fire (think of the fire challenge from Survivor).


Most of the time, the best friendships come from a slow burn, carefully peeling away the layers to get to that soul connection you are seeking. It requires patience and love, but if the other person is willing, then you have a much better chance at building something long-lasting and meaningful.

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